Santa Rosa, 1963: Some Thoughts from Kevin D. Randle

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The 1963 Santa Rosa UFO Crash
Since the publication of Crash – When UFOs Fall from the Sky, I have learned more about some of the cases mentioned. One of those, which I only reported in the Epilogue was from Santa Rosa, New Mexico and involved a hospital employee.

Given what I knew about the case, I wasn’t impressed with it. I wrote:

The Santa Rosa story by a medical technician who told of an emergency call that took her and an ambulance driver some 18 miles from town is a case in point.
She told researchers that when they reached the two police cars blocking the road, she and the driver got out of the ambulance to talk to one of the State Troopers. They saw three small bodies on the ground. The nurse thought immediately of children and asked about parents, but was told there weren’t any parents. She did see some wreckage, enough to suggest two cars might have collied, but she couldn’t identify the type of cars.

The little bodies were only 3 to 3 1/2 feet tall and had been burned. They were oozing a brownish fluid. One of the bodies had an arm that was broken or damaged in some way. She could find no vital signs, but they put them into the ambulance to return to town anyway.

At the hospital, she took x-rays of all three. About an hour after they reached the hospital, the Air Force arrived and she said an officer, who she thought was a colonel, ordered everything removed, including the x-rays and any notes she had. She also saw that the Air Force had a flatbed truck with something covered by a tarp. Once the Air Force had everything gathered up, they drove off.

According to Ryan Wood’s Majic Eyes Only, she had never mentioned the crash because she had been warned that the government had “a long arm.” She was never to speak of this. And she didn’t talk about it until she saw pictures of hungry children in Somalia. She thought they looked like the little bodies that had been recovered, meaning the strangely shaped bodies and the overly large appearing heads look something like the starving children.

I suspected that the case was mostly invention because it was single witness and the reactions of the people involved, according to the story, just didn’t ring true to me. And I haven’t even mentioned that the Air Force would have had no authority to confiscate the hospital records, or that I would have thought that those at the hospital would think to hide some evidence. Surely someone would have had the foresight to keep some of the documentation on something so extraordinary.

Then I read an account of the case from Carol Rainey who had been married to Budd Hopkins. She was there, during the 1990s, participating in and documenting his research into alien abduction. It was Budd who stumbled across the Santa Rosa case in 1995 though Rainey’s involvement wouldn’t begin until 1997.

According to Rainey, in her article in Paratopia magazine available online at
http://tiny.cc/2pzis., Budd investigated the crash case in 1995 with Walt Webb, who had trained under Allen Hynek. They traveled to Santa Rosa to interview the retired X-ray technician, Bina “Beanie” Bean.

Rainey wrote that Bean had told local MUFON representatives that in either the spring or winter of 1963, she had been riding shotgun in an ambulance that sped to a crashed saucer site on a remote desert road and returned with severalnon-human little bodies. She’d X-rayed them, she said, and described them in detail.

That was when the military arrived and cleaned out every scrap of evidence, threatening the hospital staff to keep their mouths shut. Bean drew maps and named names. But, as Walt Webb wrote to Rainey several years later: “We had only one anecdotal story by one alleged eyewitness to a 32-year-old alleged episode!”
Rainey wrote, “In 1997, Budd and I returned to follow-up on the Beanie storywhile in nearby Roswell. I taped Budd’s interview with the eccentric Beanie, noticing that she was starting to embroider a great deal around the edges of her original story of a crash retrieval, including claiming her own abduction experiences and asserting that her older sister was the famously elusive nursewho warned off the mortician at Roswell, shortly after that alleged crash.”

At this point, I would have punched out of the story, simply because, by 1997, I was convinced that there had been no nurse and that Glenn Dennis was being less than candid with us, as I have recently detailed.

I probably wouldn’t have had much more to do with the case when I learned that, but according to Rainey, “Neither she [Beanie] nor Budd had tracked down or spoken to any of the long list of possible witnesses. The only glint of confirmation of this single eyewitness’s story came during our visit to the elderly widow of the ambulance driver. When pressed, she seemed to vaguely recall that the Air Force had indeed once stripped the ambulance clean and taken the billable trip ticket, as Beanie claimed. But the widow had no idea what year or what decade that might have occurred in.”

Rainey wrote that when they returned to New York, she had made a short film from the interviews. She thought that “Beanie was quirky and entertaining and I left the validity of the case up in the air.”

Budd believed the case to have merit and again, according to Rainey, used it in his lectures and seminars. But she was upset that Budd had never attempted to find any of the other alleged witnesses so she began to dig a little deeper into the file.

She wrote, “In it were two
letters to Budd from Walt Webb, written severalmonths after their 1995 expedition… Webb expressed grave doubt about Beanie’s credibility, citing major discrepancies in her stories, told to three separate interviewers.”

Beanie sometimes claimed there were three bodies and other times there were but two. She said that they had been lined up under a sheet near the wrecked ship and told MUFON investigators that the bodies were hanging out of the craft.

In what might be the biggest of the changes, Rainey wrote, “In that same report, Beanie talked of a ‘coroner’s inquest’ at the hospital, bringing in people off the street as witnesses; in her account to Webb and Hopkins, she and a Dr. Galvin were the only people present for examination of the bodies. But it wastoo late for such reservations…”

I wanted to know what Walt Webb had to say about this case, and this case only. In an email to me he said that the material about the Santa Rosa UFO crash as published in Rainey’s article was essentially correct.

So now we all know a little more about this case. I didn’t think it was very solid based on the little I knew about it, but this seems to have cemented those reservations. Yes, witnesses change stories subtly in each telling but the major features don’t change. You don’t move from three bodies to two, and you don’t come up with a coroner’ s inquest using people off the street. That simply is too much.

And I know what you all are thinking. In the Roswell case, there are tales of three bodies, four bodies and sometimes five. But each of those numbers came from a different witness and where one might have only seen three, another might have seen four. If the witness changes the number, then we begin to wonder about all the observations by that witness.

I saw some of the same things in the Willingham – Del Rio crash where he changed the date three times, the type of aircraft a couple of times and was unable to provide any documentation for his alleged Air Force career.

Here is another UFO crash case that I believe we can eliminate from the listings. It is single witness and there is no corroboration for it. This case can join Del Rio on the list of those explained.

– Kevin D. Randle blogspot, 2011

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Alien Captured on Film in 1930’s Alaska by Grandfather Who Disclosed It Day Before He Died!

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The picture above was taken in the early 1930s by the sender’s grandfather, who lived in Alaska. The entity was first seen when the grandfather was on his way to a lake. He chased the entity until he got close enough to take this one picture. It was some four months before the photograph was developed, being in in a remote, sparsely populated area. The sender received the picture from his grandfather only last week. His grandfather died the day after giving him the photo, and relating his story.


Source: UFOCasebook.com (B.J. Booth, editor)

Letter from ‘witness’ to UFOCasebook.com:

Subj: Photograph taken by my grandfather

Date: 8/14/2003

Dear Sir,

The included picture was taken by my grandfather in the early 1930s. I scanned the image immediately after he gave it to me last week. I wish to remain anonymous since I don’t want anything to do with any research or whatever on this.

I know it looks like an alien or a Bigfoot and I know my grandfather was telling me the truth about him taking this picture. That’s why I think it should be in the right hands. You are the only one I’m sending this to, so please respect my privacy and don’t contact me about this.

Thanks in advance,

Yours,

(Name withheld)


From UFOCasebook.com editor B. J. Booth:

The only additional information is contained on the bottom of the full size image, which tells us the following:

The picture was taken in the early 1930s by the sender’s grandfather, who lived in Alaska. The entitiy was first seen when the grandfather was on his way to a lake. He chased the entity until he got close enough to take this one picture. It was some four months before the photograph was developed, being in in a remote, sparsely populated area. The sender received the picture from his grandfather only last week His grandfather died the day after giving him the photo, and relating his story.

1955…

The following alien photos were distributed around the internet after release in 1995 from China. The Chinese translation stated: “Based upon a source from the Japanese UFO Institute, the picture or photograph shows the 1970 alien incident.” The photos of the alien were believed to be taken or the alien body found in Gongzui on Dadu River (southwest of Leshan, China).” OR it’s the prop found in the International UFO Museum Research Center in Roswell, New Mexico.

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Off the Beaten Path…Have You Seen Our Writing Blog? Welcome to “The Starving Writers’ Club”!

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Welcome to the Starving Writers’ Club!

WELCOME to our new blog: “The Starving Writers’ Club”! We love this new site! AND we know you will, too! There is a writer in you and we want to help that writer grow.

Our Charter:

The Starving Writers’ Club is a writerly advice and inspiration blog where we keep things light & humorous; but still very informative, up-to-date, and always encouraging. We will cover things like writing technique and craft; artsy-fartsy-ness topics; quotes; how-tos; writing samples from classic writers; and maybe even from you and your neighbor! Why not?

Word of the Week:

“Vapors”: In archaic usage, the vapors is a reference to the treatment of certain mental or physical states, such as hysteria, mania, clinical depression, bipolar disorder, lightheadedness, fainting (from publisher rejections), flush, withdrawal syndrome (because no one wants to celebrate your supreme talent), mood swings, etc. where a sufferer lost mental focus. The term was often applied to the melodramatic behavior of women in centuries past who felt light-headed or “faint”. (parentheses, ours).

Our Motto:

‘Don’t let “the vapors” take you down! You ARE a FABULOUS writer. So, get up, dust off your pearls, grab that tumbler of “ambition-on-the-rocks” and kick some ass, Baby!’

So come see us and follow us at: https://thestarvingwritersclub.wordpress.com/

Off the Beaten Path, But…I Came Back Haunted! Don’t Miss Story #1 in Our New Ghost Story Anthology!

GGSETFriends, please don’t forget that I am honored to be publishing the first book by Sanguine Woods Publishing(sm) on my blog @ Haint-Blue Shudders (link below).

I don’t like hype. And so I don’t spin it or any other BS. THIS IS A GREAT BOOK. Rare ghost story reprints (you have not read these I’ll bet, I haven’t) and a few new stories written in the old-fashioned ghost story vein.

The Greatest Ghost Stories Ever Told is a celebration of the places where the Gothic tradition has overlapped with a creative and unique intellect (writers like Le Fanu and Richard Hichens come to mind, and Blackwood and Machen), driven to write about the things that haunt us in the darker hours.

Edited, compiled and Introduced by blogger, writer, and Denver-based poet, Sanguine Woods. Each month, a new story will be published on the blog. (STORY 1 IS ALREADY OUT THERE! HAVE YOU READ IT?) (Link below)

I’m excited!

In late 2017 (if the creek don’t rise) the full ebook (with some new material not published on the blog, and perhaps a surprise or two for supporters of the blog publishing event each month) will be made available; and then, if all goes as planned, in the first half of 2018, Sanguine Woods Publishing(sm)* will publish its first trade paperback edition of The Greatest Ghost Stories Ever Told.

I know Sanguine plans to give 100% of the book’s proceeds to charity and is working on that as we speak. In fact if you have a charity in mind and would share it with us, that would be cool. We want to touch not just readers and lovers of horror and good literature, but also human beings. Because it’s the right thing to do.

Please read Story 1** and comment, share, support this very cool effort. We are doing it for you. And for the ghostly tradition in literature. Cheers!

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*Sanguine Woods Publishing(sm) will publish its first ebook: The Greatest Ghost Stories Ever Told, ed. by Sanguine Woods in late 2017, with a trade paperback to follow in 2018: please follow this effort and support us as you can here:

https://haintblueshudders.wordpress.com/2017/03/25/the-greatest-ghost-stories-ever-told-an-anthology-of-frightening-tales-by-various-authors-part-1-introduction-table-of-contents/

**Read the first story in the new anthology here, where the book will continue to be published, story by story:

https://haintblueshudders.wordpress.com/2017/03/26/story-1-how-love-came-to-professor-guildea-by-richard-hichens-the-greatest-ghost-stories-ever-told-ed-sanguine-woods-2017/